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Top IT Jobs of 2012

Two new surveys show the job outlook for some of the best and worst IT positions in the US this year.

Tech Careers Spotlight10

For engineers, the job hunting process has become more complicated

Tuesday April 15, 2014
It might be good news for a lot of IT pros. Companies are no longer depending so heavily on the job interview. That's good news for many IT pros because they would rather be judged on their skills and knowledge than on a 30-minute discussion with a hiring manager. Many companies are using recruiting firms that use proprietary software to match them with the best job candidates. In this piece, you'll read about three such places and why they think their methods save a lot of trouble and money in the job/candidate process. Still, it takes some effort to make sure your data -- that is, your skill set -- is available enough that the software can find it.

Job search tips for the serious IT pro

Monday April 7, 2014
The job outlook for IT pros is looking good. I have some recommendations for making your job search a successful one. First, if you think you'd like to work for a top tech company--and who wouldn't?--here are a list of some of the best and some tips for how to get your foot in the door. A couple of the hottest fields in IT now are Security (as usual) and big data. Here's why security is still a major area. And if you think you might make the move into big data where opportunity grows every day, you might be surprised at just how big data is used in almost every industry.

Keep those resume holes plugged while looking for a job

Monday March 3, 2014
Few people will deny that looking for a job is the hardest job of all. Not only do you have to look for openings, but you have to manage your connections and make sure your resume is razor sharp. Unfortunately, if your job search leads to a significant (more than two months) lapse in work history, you have to manage the perception that that may cause. Particularly in IT, such a lapse can make it look like your skills are gathering dust. Luckily, there are a few things you can do in the meantime. You can turn to temporary work or do contract work, as described in this article. You can also volunteer your skills. You'll find that you fill up those holes in your resume but you may also gain new skills along the way.

The Mobile App Gold Rush

Monday November 19, 2012

Apple is reporting this week that its iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad has helped create over 275,000 jobs in the U.S. with another 6,000 openings posted in want ads across the country.

So far, Apple reports it has paid $6.5 billion to developers through the Apple App Store. Of course, none of these numbers include developers building apps for other platforms like Android or Windows.

This works out to just over $23,000 per developer, but it doesn't take an expert to know that apps like Angry Birds, GarageBand and Minecraft put these earnings on a steep curve. It's also difficult to determine how many registered app developers haven't yet put out an app. But how big is that curve and what can the average mobile app developer expect to make in a year?

An informal survey of 252 developers done by Steaming Colour discovered that 36 percent were full-time game developers. The rest were part-time and only 4 percent worked for a game development company. About 14 percent made under $100 so far. A quarter made under $1,000. A quarter made under $10,000 and about 22 percent made under $100,000. About 15 percent have made over $1 million in lifetime revenue from the Apple App Store.

Ethan Nicholas was one app developer who made it big in 2008 with an artillery game app, iShoot, which he wrote himself in six weeks. It sold 17,000 copies and returned more than $1 million to him, according to a recent article in the New York Times. His subsequent apps barely brought in any revenue at all.

It's much harder to make it big in app development today simply because of the quality of the competition and the sheer number of apps available - over 700,000 and counting, he explained. For his own success, Nicholas chalks it up to "sheer dumb luck and being in the right place at the right time."

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